Daycare for Dogs!

In our current world of social distancing and self-quarantine, our dogs are happily basking in significantly more human company than they are used to having. However, dogs need some interaction that they can only get from their fellow canines. Daycare for dogs can fill that gap.

When you were a kid, you likely enjoyed spending time with your family. However, there were some life lessons you could only pick up by playing with other kids. Your dogs are the same. They love playing with you, but interacting with other dogs will give them social skills they won’t get otherwise.

For example, we’ve all seen dogs seem to lose their minds when they see another dog while taking a walk. Dog day care allows them to learn social cues – who wants to play, and who wants to be left alone.

Dogs are social animals. Put simply, dogs like other dogs and want to spend time with them. The more they are able to do that, the less anxiety and aggression they will display the next time they meet a stranger on a walk.

If your dog is a high-energy breed like a Labrador or German shepherd, they need more exercise than they can get from occasional walks and play with humans. They need to run, jump and wrestle, and they can do that best with other dogs. Allowing them to burn off that energy will also help them sleep better at night.

And, on top of it all, you need an occasional break. We all adore our pets, but we also need our own quiet time, without having to provide the attention that dogs constantly seek. With dog day care, they get the attention, and you get some time to yourself.

At Wagglebottoms, dog day care is called DayPlay. When you pick up your dog at the end of the day, he or she will be well-fed, well-loved and worn out. We would be happy to talk with you about whether your dog is a good candidate for DayPlay as well as his or her specific needs. You can find more information about our services online, then make a reservation. You can also ask any questions you have or reserve your spot by calling 765-216-7730.

What’s In Your Dog’s First Aid Kit?

The current pandemic has reminded us all about the importance of being prepared for an emergency. Preparation is key, because when the emergency hits, you may not have the time or opportunity to gather the supplies you need. The situation is the same with your dog – preparing yourself now can help you avoid disaster, or at least unnecessary pain and hassle, later.

The good news is that much of what you have on-hand to take care of human injuries will work just as well for your dog. This list is especially important if you are traveling with your dog and don’t have access to your home supplies. Here is what you should have in your dog first aid kit, according to the American Kennel Club.

  • The current pandemic has reminded us all about the importance of being prepared for an emergency. Preparation is key, because when the emergency hits, you may not have the time or opportunity to gather the supplies you need. The situation is the same with your dog – preparing yourself now can help you avoid disaster, or at least unnecessary pain and hassle, later.The good news is that much of what you have on-hand to take care of human injuries will work just as well for your dog. This list is especially important if you are traveling with your dog and don’t have access to your home supplies. Here is what you should have in your dog first aid kit, according to the American Kennel Club.
    1. Gauze, to dress your dog’s wounds.
    2. Non-stick bandages, to help your dog’s wounds heal without sticking to his or her fur.
    3. Self-adherent medical tape can reduce swelling and ease pain.
    4. Cotton balls, to clean cuts and wounds.
    5. Hydrogen peroxide, to help prevent infection.
    6. Antibiotic spray, to treat cuts, sores, rashes, allergies and more.
    7. Milk of Magnesia, which can help counteract poison.
    8. Digital thermometer, to check for fever.
    9. Pillbox, to help organize medications.
    10. Scissors, to cut bandages and gauze.
    11. Tweezers, to pick ticks or splinters from your dog.
    12. Magnifying glass and flashlight, to help you see splinters, ticks or small wounds.
    13. Syringes, to flush wounds or deliver medication.
    14. Towel, to provide some protection in inclement weather.
    15. Soft muzzle, in case your dog becomes frantic after an injury.
    16. Leash and collar to use as spares in case they are lost in an emergency.
    17. Portable dog bowls that can hold a week’s worth of food, in case an emergency leaves you unable to get more immediately.

The dog care experts at Wagglebottoms are happy to help you put together your kit or address any specific issues your dog may have. Stay prepared, and stay safe!

Keeping Up with The Fur

The most important responsibility of owning a dog is keeping up with the appropriate grooming needs. Every dog’s coat is different and requires specific attention depending on the breed. For example, Boxers are short coats but still could use a light trim, especially in the summer time, to reduce the shedding while the labradoodle breed is considered a “non-shedding” breed but needs to stay on a tight grooming schedule because the coat gets matted if left unmaintained.

Not grooming your dog’s coat can negatively impact your dog’s health. The fur can become matted and pull the skin which causes discomfort for your dog. Let’s go back to the Labradoodle breed. There are beliefs that since this breed is non-shedding and hypo-allergenic that the coat does not need a lot of attention… FALSE. In fact, the less your Labradoodle sheds the more brushing and grooming your dog is likely to need! WALA has great at home grooming tips and tricks on how to keep their coat looking great and staying healthy.

At home grooming does not mean you have to bathe, blow dry, trim, cut, and brush your dog every week. It’s as simple as brushing your dog’s coat which also allows you to check your dog over for any hidden health signs. AKC recommends you talk with your local groomer for the best brush and other tools specific to your breed before beginning. If you don’t have a groomer, then reach out to Wagglebottoms! They have the best grooming professionals that are trained and certified to care for your dog’s coat and other hygiene needs.

Nail Care for Dogs

Keeping a dog’s nails the proper length is a critical part of keeping a dog healthy and out of pain. Dogs that are normally outdoors will naturally wear their nails down on a daily basis when they walk, run, or play on rough surfaces while indoor dogs don’t get that natural wear and tear. Either way, your dog’s nails are an important part of their health and need to be kept on a trimming schedule to maintain a healthy length.

Inside the dog’s nail is a main vein called a “quick” and the hard outer layer we see is the shell. The quick supplies blood to the nail and runs through the core. Nerves in the quick causes bleeding and discomfort when the nail is cut too short.

Also, the nail is connected to the first bone in the toe, so when the nails are too long that causes extreme pain and discomfort to our beloved dog. If you hear them on the floors then it’s time for trim!

There are different tools and resources available to help you trim your dog’s nails. Nail clippers come in a wide range of styles and sizes perfect for your dog’s breed and size and there are many ways to go about the trimming.

  • Nail clippers designed for dogs
  • Dremel (this is a grinding tool that sands off the nail)
  • Make sure you’re in a comfortable position to prevent any injuries during the trim
  • Hold each paw and spread the toes
  • Reward the pup with treats so next time they can look forward to the end

The ASPCA is great resource for you to review before moving forward with the nail care.

If you realize that trimming your dog’s nail just isn’t “cutting” it for you, call Wagglebottoms! We’ll make sure your pup has the best pedicure in town.